What is zero degrees longitude?

Answer

Zero degrees longitude is the Prime Meridian, also known as the Greenwich Meridian. The home of Greenwich Mean Time and the Prime Meridian of the World is located at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, United Kingdom.

The Greenwich Meridian was chosen in 1884 as the Prime Meridian in a landslide vote after 25 countries met in Washington D.C. for the International Meridian Conference. The meridian was defined by the position of a transit circle telescope built by Sir George Biddell Airy. The exact position of the Prime Meridian is always changing as the Earth's crust is always moving, but the original reference to the meridian remains the Airy Transit Circle at the Royal Observatory.

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Q&A Related to "What is zero degrees longitude?"
lots of things. 0 degrees longitude (also called the prime meridian) runs through england, europe, and africa.
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Lines of longitude are imaginary, vertical lines along the surface of the Earth that are used as coordinates to determine locations east and west of a reference line. All lines of
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-- England.-- France.-- Spain.
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When you give a set of latitude/longitude coordinates, you narrow the spot. down to a single point, so it's not possible for a whole country to be there. That point is in southwestern
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