What is a 1:18 scale measurement?

Answer

A 1:18 scale is standard for many scale models and figures. This scale means that each unit of measurement on the scale model equals 18 units of the same measurement on the original. This scale is also known as the 2/3-inch scale because 2/3 inch represents 1 foot.

Scale models are measured in inches or centimeters. Thus, 1 inch of width or depth on the scale model equals 18 inches of width or depth on the original. Common examples of models sold at this scale include diecast model cars, action figures and dollhouses. A typical car model using this scale is 20 to 30 centimeters, or 8 to 12 inches, long.

Q&A Related to "What is a 1:18 scale measurement?"
1 18 scale is a scale used for models, particularly model cars and doll houses. It means that for every 18 inches of the real thing is represented by 1 inch on the model. So a 1 18th
http://www.ask.com/web-answers/Vehicles/Other/how_...
Created by seismologist Charles Richter in 1934, the Richter Scale is used today to measure the magnitude of an earthquake. The Richter Scale has developed into incorporating several
http://www.ehow.com/list_6869751_three-scales-meas...
The Mercalli scale.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_scale_earthq...
Richter Scale of course ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ The Moment Magnitude Scale (MMS) was developed
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Which+scale+more+accurat...
Explore this Topic
The Richter scale is a standard scale that is used to indicate the magnitude of an earthquake. It is essentially a logarithmic scale meaning that it measures in ...
The Mercalli intensity scale is a seismic scale that is used for computing the strength of an earthquake. The scale calculates the aftermath of an earthquake based ...
The pH scale measures the acidity or how basic a substance is. It ranges from 0(zero) to 14. A pH of 7 on the scale is neutral. A pH less than 7 is acidic whereas ...
About -  Privacy -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback  -  Sitemap  © 2014 Ask.com