What is a church homecoming?

Answer

A church homecoming is an event when former congregation members return to the church to reconnect with current members, according to the African American Lectionary. The practice of homecoming has strong roots in the South's historically African American churches.

Churches that celebrate homecoming often have a sermon that acknowledges the history of the church, which teaches younger members about the church's legacy. Following the service, members often participate in a dinner, either a potluck-style picnic or a formal gathering. Some churches schedule homecoming at the same time as an annual church anniversary or as an event that precedes a revival.

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