What is a "deed of easement"?

Answer

A "deed of easement" is a signed, legal document that grants the right to use another person's land for a specifically stated purpose. This deed is different from a right-of-way easement, which gives someone the right to travel simply across property that is owned by another person.

A common example of a deed of easement is one that gives a utility company the right to put up power lines or bury pipes on a property. In this example, both the land owner and the person or company that needs to utilize the land benefit from a deed of easement. A land owner who grants a deed of easement faces restrictions on what can be done to that portion of land, specifically in regards to building new structures or fencing on it.

Q&A Related to "What is a "deed of easement"?"
In contemplating the sale of public land to a private party, a local government might be concerned about the implications on traffic flows in the future. As part of the agreement,
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The two most common types of easements are utility and rights of use. All utility companies have a small swatch of your property that they can use to gain access to their lines. They
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Your house's warranty deed should have an attachment that spells out the conditions of the easement. The documents received back from the title company will have your warranty deed
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Yes, it certainly could. An easement doesn't need to be mentioned on a deed in order to be valid. It may only be mentioned once in the document that created it. The title to the property
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Ask.com Answer for: what is a deed of easement
What Is a Deed of Easement?
Legal issues regarding property often turn on the extent to which a person can use and enjoy a parcel of property. In some instances, a person who is not the owner of a piece of land has rights to use land owned by another. In this scenario, an easement... More »
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Source: www.ehow.com
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