What Is a Fault Line?

Answer

A fault line is a break in the surface of the Earth where one side of the break is pushed up against the other. Fault lines are caused by Earthquakes.
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3 Additional Answers
Ask.com Answer for: what is a fault line
fault line
NOUN [GEOLOGY]
1.
the intersection of a fault with the surface of the earth or other plane of reference.
Source: Dictionary.com
A fault line is a particular area in which an earthquake is likely to occur or has occurred, due to the composition of the land. A fault line may go off only periodically, but is a dangerous place to be around!
A fault line is a place in the Earth where the continental plates grind together. When they shift in a major sort of way, we get earthquakes. Magma sometimes forces its way up at those points as well.
Explore this Topic
The fault lines on the east coast run along the Appalachian Mountains. In better detail of its placement it runs between New York and Alabama. In a recent survey ...
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