Flow of Groundwater?

Answer

A groundwater flow is the part of a streamflow which has infiltrated the ground, has entered the phreatic zone and has been discharged into the stream channel via springs or seepage water. In hydrogeology it is usually measured by the Groundwater flow equation.
2 Additional Answers
Groundwater flow is the flow of water that seeps and travels through underground rocks and soil. Groundwater is stored in geologic pores and cavities of the earth's crust and it is forced to flow, because of strong underground pressures.
Groundwater flow is the movement of water that travels and seeps through soil and rock underground. Water flows across a land and penetrates the surface soil and rock. Once it goes under, it is still moving, whereby the speed depends on the materials under and amount of water.
Q&A Related to "Flow of Groundwater?"
1. Determine the gradient (i) of the groundwater table using a potentiometric surface map. Regional and local potentiometric maps are often available from state natural resources
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The flow of groundwater is an aquifer.
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Groundwater flow is generally affected by three factors. First is soil particle size. Water flows faster through sand than through silt or clay. Second is slope. Land with a greater
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Fast ground water movement may be a mile per day. Slow ground water might move less
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