Making Hockey Pucks?

Answer

A hockey puck is made of vulcanized rubber. Earlier, the players either used coal, a piece of wood or a ball while playing hockey, the first hockey puck was made in 1875 and was used in Montreal. Modern pucks are three inches in diameter, one inch in height and they weigh approximately 160 grams.
Q&A Related to "Making Hockey Pucks?"
Before the process of vulcanization was accidentally stumbled upon by Charles Goodyear in December 1839, rubber would become very brittle and break when it became cold and soft when
http://www.ehow.com/facts_4969819_what-hockey-puck...
1. Granular rubber is mixed with special bonding material by hand. 2. The mixture is put in a two part (male-female) mold. 3. The mold is cold compressed. (This procedure actually
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_is_a_hockey_puck_mad...
A hockey puck is made of vulcanized rubber. The top and bottom of some pucks are
http://www.chacha.com/question/where-are-hockey-pu...
Ice hockey requires a hard disk of vulcanized rubber. A standard ice hockey puck is black. Text us!
http://www.kgbanswers.com/what-is-a-hockey-puck-ma...
1 Additional Answer
Ask.com Answer for: what is a hockey puck made of
What is a Hockey Puck Made of?
The hockey puck is a 3-by-1 inch disc made out of vulcanized rubber. Hockey pucks are very hard and slide easily over the frozen surface of the ice that the sport is played on. They are kept frozen before a game so that they will not bounce so much on... More »
Difficulty: Easy
Source: www.ehow.com
Explore this Topic
What is the average speed of a hockey puck?

Art Ross designed the modern hockey puck in 1940. Since they became standardized, hockey pucks are ...
The regulation size of an NHL hockey puck is a diameter of three inches and a thickness of one inch. The regulation weight is between 5.5 ounces and 6 ounces. ...
To determine how much a hockey puck can weigh, it depends on who is using it. The official National Hockey League game puck will weigh between 5.5 ounces and 6 ...
About -  Privacy -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback  -  Sitemap  © 2014 Ask.com