Linear Settlement?

Answer

A linear settlement is a type of settlement whereby people settle and build homes along a transport route. It is usually caused due to the fact that people can be able to get easy access to transport themselves and their goods and services. Examples of linear settlement in the UK include Manchester and London.
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In geography, a linear village, or linear settlement,[1] is a small to medium-sized settlement that is formed around a transport route, such as a road, river, or canal. Initially
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Ask.com Answer for: what is a linear settlement
What Is a Linear Settlement?
Linear settlement is a geographic term that describes a group of mostly residential buildings arranged along a main thoroughfare or a coast. Linear settlements can also be formed where growth is restricted by hills, valleys or rivers.... More »
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Source: www.ehow.com
Linear settlement is a geographic term that describes a group of mostly residential buildings arranged along a main thoroughfare or a coast. Linear settlements can also be formed where growth is restricted by hills, valleys or rivers. They may also occur where poor drainage prevents development in certain directions.
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