What Is an Example of a Metallic Bond?

Answer

A metallic bond is the electrostatic attractive forces between the free electrons in the last energy level of an atom. The electrons are usually gathered in a sea of metallic ions. The electrons are shared within the lattice of the atoms of the specific metal.
Q&A Related to "What Is an Example of a Metallic Bond?"
1. Buy glass adhesive. Most hardware and window stores sell glass adhesive. Ask the salesman for a glass adhesive that adheres glass to metal. Some glass adhesives are two parts that
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Metallic bonding speaks to the the "sharing" of the free electrons (sometimes called delocalized electrons) in a metal structure on the atomic level. It might be better
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n. The chemical bond characteristic of metals, in which mobile valence electrons are shared among atoms in a usually stable crystalline structure.
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Metallic bonds (n) are formed from the attraction between mobile el...
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Ask.com Answer for: what is a metallic bond
metallic bond
NOUN [CHEMISTRY]
1.
the type of chemical bond between atoms in a metallic element, formed by the valence electrons moving freely through the metal lattice.
Source: Dictionary.com
Metallic bonding is the eletromagnetic interaction between electrons. It is a bonding between atoms within metals and it involved the sharing of free electrons.
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