What Is a Moat Used for?

Answer

Moats were traditionally used for defence. They were dug around castles, and habitually filled with water. A moat thus made it very difficult for enemy forces to attack towns, castles or large instalments of people.
2 Additional Answers
A moat is a deep wide ditch, usually filled with water, typically surrounding a fortified medieval town, fortress or castle as a protection against assault. There were also moats in the medieval era which were without water, referred to as dry moats.
A moat is a deep and broad ditch or trench, which is either dry or filled with water or oil and surrounds a castle, building or town. Historically, it was used to provide security to walled kingdoms from attacks and raids. In addition, it was a common means of securing buildings in the medieval times.
Q&A Related to "What Is a Moat Used for"
so people could not come inside the castle.
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A moat is a deep, broad ditch, either dry or filled with water, that surrounds a castle, building or town, historically to provide it with a preliminary line of defence. In some places
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