What is a neutral atom?

Answer

Atoms lose their neutrality when electrons are either lost or gained. Atoms that have lost or gained electrons are called ions. Neutral atoms have the same number of protons, neutrons and electrons.

Protons have a positive charge, while electrons have a negative charge. Ions are electrically charged atoms, having a negative charge if they gained an electron and a positive charge if they lost an electron. The chemical and physical properties of an atom change as ions are created. When two ions with opposite charges come into contact, they are attracted to each other. They may begin to share electrons in either covalent or electrovalent bonds.

Q&A Related to "What is a neutral atom?"
a equal number of protons and electrons.
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The word neutrality means not taking sides or setting aside biases in making judgments. For example, jury members should maintain neutrality before joining a case.
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An atom has a dense, central nucleus that contains protons and neutrons. Electrons surround the nucleus. Adding the total number of electrons and protons together determines the atom's
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Oxygen atoms are neutral because they have the same number of protons (positively charged) as electrons (negatively charged) so the atom ends up neutral.
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