What Is a Non Solicitation Agreement?

Answer

A non-solicitation agreement is an agreement, usually between an employee and an employer, that restricts an individual from soliciting either employees or customers of a business after leaving the business.
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1 Additional Answer
A non-solicitation agreement is an agreement that bars a professional (usually a former employee) from soliciting employees and customers of the business after leaving his current place of employment.
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