What Is Pique Knit?

Answer

Pique or Marcella, refers to a weaving style, normally used with cotton yarn, which is characterized by raised parallel cords or fine ribbing. Pique is a knitting style using cotton yarn in which thin ribbing is present in the garment. Although the texture of pique is very soft, you can feel the thin ribbing throughout the garment.
Q&A Related to "What Is Pique Knit?"
The pique polo, or tennis shirt is the most recognizable item of clothing using the pique method. A pique polo is a collared T-shaped shirt with a placket of two to three buttons.
http://www.ehow.com/about_6613128_pique-shirt_.htm...
Pique can be a tightly woven fabric with raised cords or a sudden outburst of anger.
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-pique
bleak. creek. geek. leak. leek. meek. reek. seek. teak.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_rhymes_with_pique
pique: cause to feel resentment or indignation
http://www.kgbanswers.com/what-is-pique/2926701
3 Additional Answers
Ask.com Answer for: what is a pique
pique
[peek]
VERB (USED WITH OBJECT) [PIQUED, PIQU·ING.]
1.
to affect with sharp irritation and resentment, especially by some wound to pride: She was greatly piqued when they refused her invitation.
2.
to wound (the pride, vanity, etc.).
3.
to excite (interest, curiosity, etc.): Her curiosity was piqued by the gossip.
4.
to arouse an emotion or provoke to action: to pique someone to answer a challenge.
5.
Archaic. to pride (oneself) (usually followed by on or upon).
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Source: Dictionary.com
A pique refers to a weaving style, normally used with cotton yarn, which is characterized by raised parallel cords or fine ribbing. Twilled cotton and corded cotton are close relatives. The weave is part of white tie, and some accounts even say the fabric was invented specifically for this use.
Pique is a noun that refers to a feeling of irritation or resentment that results from some pride. Some of its synonyms are umbrage and resentment. For instance, a person can be piqued by another person's curiosity.
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