What is a prime factorization of 80?

Answer

The prime factorization of the number 80 is 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 5. When multiplied together, these five numbers have a product of 80.

According to Math Is Fun, the term "prime factorization" refers to the process of finding prime numbers that, when multiplied together, produce the original number. A method to produce prime factorization is to attempt to divide the original number by the smallest prime number that divides it, then repeat the process for the remaining factor. For example, in the case of 80, the number divided by the smallest prime number results in 2 x 40. The next step is to factor the number 40, resulting in 2 x 20. Factoring the number 20 produces 2 x 10, and factoring the number 10 results in 2 x 5, and 5 is a prime number. This results in a prime factorization of 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 5 for the number 80.

Q&A Related to "What is a prime factorization of 80?"
As such: 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 5.
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80 is composite. It is 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 5. That's the prime factorization of 80.
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hi www.mathnstuff.com/papers/games/prime.htm go to this site to get your answer.hope this helps.
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80 is a composite number because it has factors other than 1 and itself. It is not a prime number. The 10 factors of 80 are 1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 16, 20, 40, and 80. The factor pairs
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