What Is a Rhythm?

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Ask.com Answer for: what is a rhythm
Rhythm is a uniform or patterned repitition of a beat, accent or occurance in time. The five main features are repetition, gradation, transition, opposition and radiation.
Q&A Related to "What Is a Rhythm"
Rhythm is the timing of musical notes being played or sung. Rhythm is the steady beat of a song and can be discovered by educating oneself in music theory and notation. Look here
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Rumba rhythm is a fusion of African and Spanish traditions. Cuban ethnologist and anthropologist Fernando Ortiz has said the origins of rumba were possibly from Gangá, a tribe
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Rhythm is a durational pattern of musical sounds and/or silences.
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3 Additional Answers
A rhythm is a regular succession, repeat pattern of sound or movement of opposite or different conditions. This may be applied to a variety of natural occurrences that have a frequency of happening between microseconds up to many years.
Rhythm refers to a movement marked by the regulation of weak and strong elements or of opposite or very different conditions. The pattern may be applied to a wide variety of cyclical natural phenomena having a frequency of anything from microseconds to millions of years.
It means repetitive pulse of music or a pattern in time of some small single group of notes.
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Idioventricular rhythm in an EKG is a cardiac rhythm that is caused by repetitive discharges of impulses. The rate is usually less than 100 beats per minute. However ...
Although the elements of rhythm are complex and varied, most experts agree that they can be summarized and expressed effectively as beat, tempo, meter and accent ...
Rhythm is a strong, regular, recurring pattern of movement or sound. It can also be defined as the methodical arrangement of musical sounds, predominantly according ...
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