Siege Tower?

Answer

A siege tower is a specialized siege engine, constructed to protect assailants and ladders while approaching the defensive walls of a fortification. The tower was often rectangular with four wheels with its height roughly equal to that of the wall or sometimes higher to allow archers to stand on top of the tower and shoot into the fortification.
1 Additional Answer
A siege tower is a structure with four platforms inside and long ladders on the back which let the attackers climb to the top of the wall as quickly as possible. It was a high tower on wheels, which would be built and rolled up to a castle in an attempt to overpower the defenders on the walls. A siege tower could be used by an attacking army to try and capture a castle.
Q&A Related to "Siege Tower?"
From about 300 B.C until about the end of the medieval era when cannons became so effective that siege towers were obsolete. If you're asking the question "In what situation
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_a_tower
1. Click your "Siege Camp" to bring up the list of units the camp can produce. Click "Siege Tower" or "Large Siege Tower" to purchase the unit. 2. Left-click
http://www.ehow.com/how_7298612_use-siege-towers-s...
Use shaped balsa wood. Copper wire for the bindings.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=201103...
When defending during a siege attack, keep your ranged units
http://www.chacha.com/question/how-do-you-defeat-t...
Explore this Topic
Some historians believe a Roman named Galileo Dart was responsible for utilizing the Roman Siege Tower. There is evidence that siege towers were in existence in ...
I assume you mean at a smaller scale. A siege tower is basically a wooden frame on wheels protected by planks of wood. Inside or on the back is a ladder that goes ...
Medieval siege towers were used as weapons. They were towers that were built by groups who wanted to storm the castle. While the castle was under siege, these ...
About -  Privacy -  AskEraser  -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback © 2014 Ask.com