What Is a Status Hearing in a Criminal Case?

Answer

A status hearing in a criminal case occurs before the case goes to trial. At the status hearing the defendant can let the court know if they are prepared for trial.
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Q&A Related to "What Is a Status Hearing in a Criminal Case?"
Many criminal cases end in a plea agreement in lieu of a trial. Negotiations between the defense and prosecution take time to complete, and courts use status hearings when the negotiations
http://www.ehow.com/facts_6860397_status-hearing-c...
when the appelate court has vacated the decision, but lacks sufficient facts to enter a judgment, thus remanding it to the trial court to enter a new judgment. In the UK. a remand
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_a_remand_hearing...
For a case to be heard/cross examined ect.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=201312...
They generally choose to hear cases involving legal questions in which the lower appellate courts have offered conflicting interpretations of federal law, as well as cases of great
http://www.quora.com/U-S-Supreme-Court/What-kind-o...
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Ask.com Answer for: what is a status hearing in a criminal case
What Is a Status Hearing in a Criminal Case?
Many criminal cases end in a plea agreement in lieu of a trial. Negotiations between the defense and prosecution take time to complete, and courts use status hearings when the negotiations are ongoing.... More »
Difficulty: Easy
Source: www.ehow.com
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