What Is a Tap and Die Set Used for?

Answer

A tap is a threaded device used to thread or re-thread a female screw. A die is the companion threading device also used to thread or re-thread, but it is used on a male screw/bolt that has been damaged or stripped. The process of threading a metal rod is called threading or chasing the rod.
Q&A Related to "What Is a Tap and Die Set Used for"
Determine the type of tap you will need. There are three different taps that perform largely separate tasks. You will need to be able to identify these types by sight. Recognize a
http://www.ehow.com/how_2096432.html
There are as many goal setting checklists available as there are kinds of people. To identify what technique will work best for you, ask yourself the following questions:
http://www.life123.com/health/stress-management/go...
A gas tap is used to control the flow of. f. uel gas (natural gas or, historically,coal gas, etc. in the home (for gas fires or other appliances) or in laboratories (for Bunsen burners
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_gas_tap_used_for
I used R and ggplot2 to generate the graphs and data for these blog posts about some of the data we think about at Kickstarter: http://blog.kickstarter.com/post... http://blog.kickstarter.com
http://www.quora.com/R-software/What-are-the-R-use...
2 Additional Answers
Ask.com Answer for: what is a tap and die set used for
What Is a Tap & Die Set Used For?
A tap is a threaded tool used to thread or re-thread a female screw/bolt hole (nut type) in metals and other solid substances capable of holding a thread (some plastics). A die is the companion threading tool used to thread or re-thread a male screw/bolt... More »
Difficulty: Easy
Source: www.ehow.com
A tap is a threaded tool used to thread or re-thread a female screw/bolt hole - nut type in metals and other solid substances capable of holding a thread some plastics. A die is the companion threading tool used to thread or re-thread a male screw/bolt that has been damaged or stripped.
About -  Privacy -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback  -  Sitemap  © 2015 Ask.com