What Is an Aftershock?

Answer

An aftershock usually happens following an earthquake. Aftershocks are a series of tremors and aftershocks can be just as dangerous as an earthquake.
Q&A Related to "What Is an Aftershock"
An aftershock is the 'mini earthquake' that occurs after the larger, main earthquake. It always occurs in the same place as the main one, although it is much smaller in the severity
http://www.ask.com/web-answers/Science/Nature/what...
aftershocks are earthquakes on a smaller scale after the main quake. they can be very dangerous because they often catch people off guard. they also can be of a large magnitude.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_are_aftershockes
The earth's underground plates have moved over, around and under each other for millions of years. This unseen activity goes awry when plates collide, causing pressure to rupture
http://www.ehow.com/info_8651270_can-happen-after-...
Aftershock:1:a tremor (or one of a series of tremors) occurring after the main shock of an
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-aftershock
2 Additional Answers
Ask.com Answer for: what is an aftershock
af·ter·shock
[af-ter-shok, ahf-]
NOUN
1.
a small earthquake or tremor that follows a major earthquake.
2.
the effect, result, or repercussion of an event; aftermath; consequence: The aftershock of the bankruptcy was felt throughout the financial community.
Source: Dictionary.com
An aftershock is a smaller Earthquake that takes place after a larger Earthquake has previously taken place. This occurs when the Earth's crust adjusts to the effects of the main shock.
Explore this Topic
Earthquakes are divided into three categories, Foreshocks, Mainshocks, and Aftershocks. When an Earthquake happens, it's considered a main shock, when the next ...
Earthquakes can cause environmental concerns that can affect peoples health. After a large earthquake the aftershocks can damage land, water sources and sewage ...
A seismograph is an instrument used to measure and make a record of any occurring vibrations in the earth's crust. These might be earthquakes, tremors or aftershocks ...
About -  Privacy -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback  -  Sitemap  © 2014 Ask.com