What Is an Elliptical Orbit?

Answer

An elliptical orbit is a term used to describe an oval shaped path of a celestial body of the planet earth and various planets in the solar system. An elliptical orbit is formed by different pull of forces like gravity.
2 Additional Answers
An elliptical orbit is a term describing an oval-shaped path of a celestial body. It is mainly used in astrophysics and astronomy and it is created by the varying pull of forces, such as gravity, on two objects, such as the Sun and a planet.
The best way to describe an elliptical orbit would be oval or egg shaped. The extent of the distortion can vary, but would be anything that is not a perfect circle.
Q&A Related to "What Is an Elliptical Orbit"
An elliptical orbit is one that is not a perfect circle. Many planets have elliptical orbits that bring them in close to the sun and then at another point it is very far away from
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1. Write down the two parameters that define the orbit: the maximum and minimum altitudes above the earth. Also make a note of the altitude of the object at the position where the
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It was Kepler who discovered that the planets orbits are elliptical.
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( ə′lip·tə·kəl ′ör·bət ) (mechanics) The path of a body moving along an ellipse, such as that described by either of two
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