What Is an Engine Misfire?

Answer

Engine misfire is a term used to describe incomplete combustion in the engine cylinder. A driver will feel a sharp jerking action when a misfire occurs. The main cause of engine misfire is a miss-timed combustion event.
Q&A Related to "What Is an Engine Misfire"
1. Open the hood and start the car. Listen to the engine for a few minutes to establish a sound in the pattern of the misfire. 2. Pull the rubber cap off the back spark plug. Listen
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A misfire is also called "predetonation" Usually it is caused by spark plugs or some deposit in the cylinder / head that is not transferring heat to the cooling jacket,
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What is the definition of a misfire in an
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As long as your car has had basic maintenance done to it it should be just fine at 90,000. Just make sure you change your oil (every 3000 mi) flush the coolant, just basic stuff here
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1 Additional Answer
An engine misfire is a violent shaking of the engine with appropriate sound effects that happens when an engine cylinder in a combustion engine misses a stroke. This causes a 25% or more loss of power in comparison to the other cylinders thus throwing the engine off balance. It may either be caused by a loss of spark, if the air/fuel mixture is out of balance or loss of compressing.
Explore this Topic
An engine cylinder misfiring can happen because if the spark, air filter or internal combustion are missing or occur at an incorrect time, the cylinder can misfire ...
An engine's cylinder misfires when ignition occurs at the wrong time or not at all. Because the engine's moving parts must be in exact locations at the moment ...
There are quite a few possible issues that could cause a car to misfire when the engine is in idle. The most common cause of engine misfires is faulty spark plugs ...
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