What Is an Example of Commensalism?

Answer

When you have two organisms; one organism benefits, the other is neither harmed nor helped. Example, a bird and a tree, the bird benefits from the tree for shelter, while the tree is neither harmed nor helped as a result.
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Ask.com Answer for: what is an example of commensalism
Commensalism is a relationship between two organisms where one organism benefits and the other gains no benefit, but also is not harmed.
Many organisms attach themselves to other organisms for transportation or better access to food. Others use hosts as shelter.
Q&A Related to "What Is an Example of Commensalism"
Commensalism is a relationship between two organisms where one benefits but the other is unaffected. One example of commensalism is the D. folliculorum mites that live in human eyelash
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and example of commensalism would be ummmm.... squirrels and trees because the tree grows fruits and nuts lol! and is unafected because the squirrel just eats it and the tree grows
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How+does+commensalism+wo...
Examples of commensalism includes hydroid living on a shell with a hermit crab
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-are-3-examples...
White elephants and egrets, whihc eat the insects tirred up by the elephant's walking. Sharks and remoras, which eat the scraps that are scattered by the sharks' feeding. Humans and
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Explore this Topic
Commensalism is seen in the animal kingdom where one animal benefits from another without affecting it. One example of Commensalism is cow birds and cattle. The ...
An example of commensalism is the epiphyte on the tree branches where orchids are supported by these trees. We also have bacteria's that live in human intestines ...
In ecology, commensalism is a type of relationship between two organisms where one benefits without affecting the other. It compares with mutualism, in which both ...
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