What Is an Open Circuit?

Answer

An open circuit is an electric trail whose normal path of current has been interrupted. This is done by either disconnection of one part of its conducting pathway from another, or by the intrusion of an electric element, such as a transistor.
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Ask.com Answer for: what is an open circuit
open circuit
NOUN [ELECTRICITY]
1.
a discontinuous circuit through which no current can flow.
Source: Dictionary.com
An open circuit is an electrical circuit that is not complete; an incomplete electric circuit in which no current flows. It is a circuit where the current flow has been interrupted by a broken fuse or an open breaker.
Q&A Related to "What Is an Open Circuit"
Open circuit is condition when current gets no path to flow to ground. It may be also defined as when voltage gets infinite resistance.
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In general, a circuit is either "open" or "closed. An open circuit has an "opening" of some kind that prevents the flow of current. A closed circuit allows
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An open circuit exists when the path for electron flow is interrupted. Sometimes this is part of the circuit design; e.g. a switch to turn a light on or off. Open circuits may also
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( ′ō·pən ′sər·kət ) (electricity) An electric circuit that has been broken, so that there is no complete path for current flow.
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Open circuit is condition when current gets no path to flow to ground. It may be also defined as when voltage gets infinite resistance. ...
Open circuit is condition when current gets no path to flow to ground. It may be also defined as when voltage gets infinite resistance. ...
An open circuit can refer to several things. If you have and electric current, and there is an incomplete path between the negative and positive terminals, it ...
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