What Is Associative Play?

Answer

Associative play is a type of play where a group of children involve themselves in similar or identical activities without formal organization, group direction, group interaction, or a definite goal.
1 Additional Answer
Associative play is a form of play in which a group of children participate in similar or identical activities without formal organization, group direction, group interaction, or a definite goal, they may talk together but do not work together to create anything specific. The children may borrow or lend toys or pieces of play equipment.
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1. Learn the rules. : The first person says a word (e.g. "food" Then, the other person should say the first word he or she thinks of (e.g. "milk" - associate,
http://www.wikihow.com/Play-Word-Association
1. Have everyone sit in an orderly fashion. Circles work best because it is easy to figure out whose turn it is. 2. Appoint a leader. The leader must choose a starting word, or you
http://www.ehow.com/how_8291563_play-freeassociati...
When children extend their knowledge and play experiences they move into "Associative Play" In this stage, three and four year old children begin playing together but it
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Brian Carney. He's not terribly well-known. Had a bit part in Up In The Air. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0138777/ Embed Quote
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