Binding Precedent?

Answer

A binding precedent is a precedent that must be followed by all lower courts that are under common legal systems. In English law, it is created by the decision of the high court and ensures certainty and consistency in the application of the law. Binding precedents from past cases are normally applied in principle to new situations by analogy.
Q&A Related to "Binding Precedent?"
Provides certainty and consistency in the application of law. Judges have clear cases to follow. Lower courts follow higher courts. It also leads to an orderly development of the
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When a legal question is decided by a court in an officially published opinion, that decision becomes a "binding precedent" for all subordinate courts in the same jurisdiction
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Definition: Binding precedents are decisions in court cases that establish legal standards that must be followed by lower courts. Supreme Court decisions establish a binding precedent
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If I follow your questions correctly, you have had two separate cases. The first was in state court and the second in federal court. Because you have retained counsel, it is improper
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1 Additional Answer
A binding precedent is a precedent which must be followed by all lower courts under common law legal systems. In English law it is usually created by the decision of a higher court, such as the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. In Civil law and pluralist systems, as under Scots law, precedent is not binding but case law is taken into account by the courts.
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