What Is Continental Shift Work?

Answer

Continental shift work is a rapidly altering three-shift system that is typically worked for seven days straight, after which workers are given time off. For instance, three mornings, two afternoons and then two nights. This working system is adopted mainly in central Europe.
Q&A Related to "What Is Continental Shift Work?"
shift solenoid, never heard of that. ill check that out and get back to you.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Where_is_the_shift_solen...
some googling shows it means 12-hour shifts, possibly alternating between day and night. Obviously, do not do full 5 shifts a week.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200801...
Mountains (when plates collide) faults (when plates
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-an-effect-o...
take out the top 4 bolts above the altenator, between those metal tubes on the metal bracket. then u have 1 bolt holding the wires to the altenator on that bracket aswell remove that
http://www.fixya.com/cars/t10901709-shift_solenoid...
2 Additional Answers
A continental shift refers to a rapidly changing system that is normally worked for seven days directly after which workers are offered a time off. For instance, they are given three mornings, afternoons and later two evenings.
“Continental shifts” are work patterns adopted primarily in central Europe. They are rapidly changing three-shift systems that are usually worked for seven days straight, after which employees are given time off. For example, three mornings, two afternoons, and then two nights.
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