What Is Continental Shift Work?

Answer

Continental shift work is a rapidly altering three-shift system that is typically worked for seven days straight, after which workers are given time off. For instance, three mornings, two afternoons and then two nights. This working system is adopted mainly in central Europe.
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2 Additional Answers
A continental shift refers to a rapidly changing system that is normally worked for seven days directly after which workers are offered a time off. For instance, they are given three mornings, afternoons and later two evenings.
“Continental shifts” are work patterns adopted primarily in central Europe. They are rapidly changing three-shift systems that are usually worked for seven days straight, after which employees are given time off. For example, three mornings, two afternoons, and then two nights.
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