What Is Electrolysis Chemistry?

Answer

Electrolysis chemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the study of the process of producing chemical changes by passing an electric current through a solution or molten salt. This result in the migration of ions to the electrodes: positive ions to the negative electrode and negative ions (anions) to the positive electrode (anode). For instance, Lead Bromide (PbBr2) can undergo electrolysis to form bromine gas and lead when the electrodes are put into the liquid and they are connected to an electrical circuit. Electrolysis is used in anodising, electroplating, extraction of metals among other uses.
Q&A Related to "What Is Electrolysis Chemistry"
In chemistry, electrolysis is a method of using an electric current to drive an
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Well here is the entire scoop. Take you pick. My guess is that your teacher is going to say none of the above (look under history) But you can at least show him you've looked. It's
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You don't need a machine, just a glass, a battery, two wires (leads) and two carbon electrodes - pencil leads will do - and a solution of the chemical being electrolysed e.g water
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How do you write electrolysis in an equation? I'm in AP-Chemistry and a little bit confused on what is electrolysis and the how to write it in an equation. I am working on this problem
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Explore this Topic
Electrolysis is used the same way in chemistry as it is in manufacturing. It is a method of using electric current to drive non- spontaneous chemical reaction. ...
Electrolysis is a method in chemistry and manufacturing that involves the application of direct electric current referred to as DC to bring about a compound reaction ...
Bielectrolysis has no meaning, but electrolysis, in chemistry, is a method of using direct electric current in order to drive an otherwise non-spontaneous chemical ...
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