What Is Expanded Form in Math?

Answer

When you use the expanded form of math, you are separating the digits. For example 123 in expanded form would be 100+20+3 and 1113 would be 1000+100+10+3.
Q&A Related to "What Is Expanded Form in Math"
expanded form is writing a number to show the value of each digit. it is shown as a sum of each digit multiplied by it's matching place. value(units,tens,hundreds,ect. in this case:
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Expanded Form is a way to write a number that shows the sum of values of each digit of
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if the original number is 274, then 200+70+4 would be the expanded form
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1. Rewrite the brackets, so that they are easiest to expand. If you have the expression (x+1)x+4) + 3(x+2) you can rewrite it as x(x+4)1(x+4)3(x+2) 2. Use the distributive property
http://www.ehow.com/how_8457408_expand-brackets-fa...
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Ask.com Answer for: what is expanded form in math
Expanded notation represents a number as the sum of each of its digits multiplied by their place value.
Many calculators can solve mathematical equations for the user. Other calculators can break down the solving of the equation to show the expanded form as well as the actual answer to assist a learner to solve these equations on their own.
The expanded form in math is a way in which numbers are broken down. An expanded form calculator cannot be used as a table needs to be constructed. The numbers can be broken down using a value chart.
Explore this Topic
An expanded form is a mathematical representation of numbers in accordance to their powers at place value or place base. It allows for easy multiplication or addition ...
When you write a number in standard form in fourth grade math, it is the opposite of expanded form. Expanded form is a way to designate the value of each place ...
The factored form in math is when the principles of multiplication are being used and utilized in order to solve the problem or domain. This is a great formula ...
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