What Is Global Winds?

Answer

Global winds covers the entire earth's wind patterns. These can be broken down into four wind belt systems in each hemisphere. They are called the same names in the northern and southern hemispheres. They are the polar easterlies, prevailing westerlies, tropical easterlies and then into the intertropical convergence zone where there is practically no wind at all.
Q&A Related to "What Is Global Winds"
Global winds are caused by several factors including the movement of the earth, Atmospheric pressure and different elevations on the surface of the earth. Look here for more information
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Winds that blow around the earth from the north pole to the south pole. Some of them are: polar westerlies prevailing easterlies Trading Breezes Equator Winds The global wind belts
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The sun falls on the surface of the earth, heating the atmosphere and the ground, which then radiates heat up into the air. The hot air rises up into the atmosphere, where it cools
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Global warming affects everyone and everything on Earth. As the temperature rises even just a few tenths of a degree climates and habitats shift and organisms are put in jeopardy.
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1 Additional Answer
Global winds happens when a narrow band of clouds and thunderstorms encircle portions of the globe. It is the Intertropical Convergence Zone that produces such.
Explore this Topic
Global winds are winds that cover a large area. They blow across the entire planet and are divided into four wind belt systems. ...
Local winds are convective winds that are small scale and local in origin. Global wind patterns move across the globe in large bands and there are six in total ...
The global wind system consists of the winds which blow across the atmosphere. The winds are given different names. Some names are polar westerlies, prevailing ...
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