What Is Mass in Science?

Answer

In science mass is the amount of matter a substance contains. It is measured in kilograms (kg) or grams (g) and it never changes. A mass of 1kg has a weight of about 10 Newtons on Earth.
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Mass is a widely used findamental property that is not understood at all. It is used widely when dealing with kinematic and static mechanics problems among other things. A similar
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Science is the study of the natural world using information gathered from the natural world. There are many subsets of science, geology and astronomy being two of them. Science is
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The natural sciences are sciences such as physics or chemistry. They are also called the hard sciences because they use data that is tangible. It is science that can be seen and touched
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There are millions of them online. They are dedicated. So if there is a particular scientific area that you are interested in the site is there to give you the required information.
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1 Additional Answer
In science, the mass of an object is considered to be the amount of matter or particles that it contains. When measuring mass, most often times a triple beam balance is used. You can find more information here: http://www. edinformatics. com/math_science/mass. htm
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