What Is Outer Space?

Answer

Outer space is a void containing low density particles that exists between astronomical bodies and objects. It is believed to have dark matter and energy. The low pressure in outer space can cause rupture of the lugs, eardrums and sinuses.
Q&A Related to "What Is Outer Space"
1. Choose a location outdoors where lights are minimal. If you live within city limits, you may have to go to a more rural area just to see the stars in the sky. 2. Use the binoculars
http://www.ehow.com/how_4515645_look-outer-space.h...
Alan is correct, but in an attempt to answer this generally, most satellite data which is collected in space is timestamped with the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), nearly synonymous
http://www.quora.com/Outer-Space-1/What-time-is-it...
Anywhere where there is light, and an object able to block the light, there will be a shadow.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_there_are_shadows_in...
Outer space refers to the area that exists beyond Earth's atmosphere. Our atmosphere is divided into several layers based on the temperatures found in each of those layers. The troposphere
http://www.answers.com/topic/what-is-outer-space-k...
2 Additional Answers
Outer space is defined as the area outside of the planet earth. Not much is known about how big outer space is. We know that we live in a galaxy called the Milky Way. There are any infinite numbers of galaxies in outer space.
Outer space is a general term that can be used to describe a vast area. This is the term that describes any area that exists outside of earth.
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The answer to the question how far is outer space is a very complex one, depending on where you are measuring from and to. More simply, outer space begins just ...
Outer Space is essentially empty, meaning it has no molecules to move to create heat. Because of this, the relative temperature of outer space is just a few degrees ...
Mass is a quantification of an object's resistance to increase in velocity. It is measured in outer space using spring, standard mass and accelerometer. Acceleration ...
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