What is phototropism?

Answer

Phototropism is a plant's response to light: a plant on a windowsill bending itself toward the window to get more sun is an example of phototropism. Tropisms are the movements plants make in response to certain stimuli, including light, gravity, touch and time.

Anyone who has kept an indoor plant in a too-dark window, or has kept a plant in a window that gets plenty of light but stays in the same position for years and years, has probably noticed that the plant seems to be stretching itself toward the light. This is one of the most observable examples of phototropism, which is a plant's growth response to light. Both the growth and the stimulus (light) are directional, which is why plants seem like they're reaching out in the light's direction.

Phototropism isn't the only kind of tropism; there are several directional stimuli that affect the way plants can grow. Plants typically move slowly, and phototropism is an example of this slow growth. A plant left in the same place and in the exact same position for a few years may bend toward the nearest light source. This isn't something that is noticeable on a day-to-day basis, but given enough time, the movement will be observable.

Q&A Related to "What is phototropism?"
Phototropism refers to the growth of certain living organisms (mainly plants and bacteria) which occurs towards a light source .
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What+is+a+negative+photo...
Phototropism:1:an orienting response to
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-phototropis...
phototropism: an orienting response to light
http://www.kgbanswers.com/what-is-phototropism/402...
in simple terms: photo tropism is the movement of plant parts in response to light stimuli. as the term suggests: photo means light and tropism means movement. photo tropism is of
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1 Additional Answer
Ask.com Answer for: what is phototropism
pho·tot·ro·pism
[foh-to-truh-piz-uhm, foh-toh-troh-piz-uhm]
NOUN [BOTANY]
1.
phototropic tendency or growth.
Source: Dictionary.com
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