What Is Police Discretion?

Answer

Police discretion refers to a sequence of decisions that police officers use in the form of stern warning offered to offenders or imprisonments. The discretion of police officers should not be impaired while dealing with crime. It is not all cases where the police have discretion.
1 Additional Answer
Police discretion is a tool used by officers to enable the judgment officers in the field to know whether he or she should be letting someone go after a stern lecture or warning. It also refers to taking someone to jail for a minor offense because they may be a danger to themselves or to the society.
Q&A Related to "What Is Police Discretion"
Police are given, in certain circumstances, the choice, option or ability to act on his own. He can use his discretion and not give you a ticket if you were speeding. We all hope
http://answers.ask.com/Society/Philosophy/what_is_...
1. Define discretion. What is discretion in terms of the law? Plainly speaking, discretion is judgment. It is up to a law enforcement officer to pick apart the "gray area"
http://www.ehow.com/how_5704834_use-police-discret...
Very simply because supervisors can't dictate what should be done in every single situation an officer may encounter. A very simple example would be that you get pulled over for speeding
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_is_police_discretion...
In law enforcement discretion is left up to each individual officer on the
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-the-concept...
Explore this Topic
Police discretion refers to the ability the officer has to make a decision at a crime scene. This also involves on how quick and accurate they can make this decision ...
Police are given, in certain circumstances, the choice, option or ability to act on his own. He can use his discretion and not give you a ticket if you were speeding ...
There are many different pros and cons to police discretion. Laws are usually crafted in a way that will not fit every situation, so a police officer many times ...
About -  Privacy -  AskEraser  -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback © 2014 Ask.com