What Is Relative Deprivation?

Answer

The phrase relative deprivation refers to the experience of being deprived of something to which one believes oneself to be entitled to have. The alternative meaning is the discontent people feel when they compare their positions to others and realize that they have less than them. It has important consequences for both behaviour and attitudes, including, political attitudes, feelings of stress, and participation in collective action.
1 Additional Answer
Relative deprivation is the way person perceives their situation compared to another person's situation. In other words, a person may feel more or less deprived when comparing themselves with someone who has more than them or less than them.
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