What Is Surface Tension of Water?

Answer

Surface tension is what causes the surface of a portion of liquid to be attracted to another surface (cohesion). It is typically measured in dynes/cm, or the force (in dynes) required to break a film length of 1cm. Water has a surface tension of 72.8 dynes/cm, at 20 degrees Celsius. The surface tension of water decreases with heat.
Q&A Related to "What Is Surface Tension of Water"
Surface tension. is a property of the surface of a liquid that causes it to behave as an elastic sheet. It allows insects, such as the water strider (pond skater, UK) to walk on water
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_water_surface_te...
Surface tension that causes water droplets on leaves to bead up and form the smallest
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-water-surfa...
1. Fill a bowl, glass or beaker with water. 2. Float a small piece of paper towel on the surface of the water. 3. Place the paperclip on top of the paper towel. 4. Push the sides
http://www.ehow.com/how_5559840_demonstrate-water-...
Surface tension is an increased attraction of molecules at the surface of a liquid and is caused by cohesion (the attraction of molecules to like molecules).
http://www.kgbanswers.com/what-is-the-surface-tens...
1 Additional Answer
Surface tension of water is a characteristic which allows it to resist force from breaking through. This allows light objects or insects to freely move along the surface without sinking.
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