What Is the Definition of Freestanding?

Answer

The word freestanding is an adjective which means not to be supported by any other structure. It is not linked, neither is it relying on anything else and this makes it independent. Some of its synonyms are detached, discrete, free, single, unconnected and unattached.
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Ask.com Answer for: what is the definition of freestanding
free·stand·ing
[free-stan-ding]
ADJECTIVE
1.
(of sculpture or architectural elements) unattached to a supporting unit or background; standing alone.
2.
not affiliated with others of its kind; independent; autonomous: a freestanding clinic, not connected with any hospital.
Source: Dictionary.com
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