Difference between Common and Statute Law?

Answer

The difference between Common law and Statute Law is that the former refers to law that changes with time depending on past practices and customs while the latter refers to a particular law passed by the state legislature.
1 Additional Answer
Statute law refers to the laws that have been passed by the legislature and have been written down and codified for use. While a common law refers to the laws that are more or less that's the way it has always been done. Common law normally relies upon the body of history and prior cases to establish what the rules are, this is one of the reasons why lawyers study past cases so much.
Q&A Related to "Difference between Common and Statute Law?"
"Common law" refers to the law that evolves over time based on past customs and practices. A "statute" is a specific law that is passed by the government.
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A statute is a law that is formally written by the state legislature. Not only is this type of law written by the state legislature, but it is also formally adapted into law via each
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Statute law is law made by legislatures in their role as law making bodies. This is the type of law that most affects us everyday. Common law is the compilation of judges decisions
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Common Law is the body of law that has evolved over centuries starting in the Middle Ages where judges pass judgements in accordance with precedents set in similar cases. Most civil
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The common law is based on past history. Codified or Statutory law has been passed by the law creating body, usually a legislature. If there is no law on the books ...
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A state court has control over the laws and statutes within its own borders. As long as a state court does not make a decision that conflicts with the United States ...
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