What is the freezing point of mercury?

Answer

Mercury has a freezing point of -38.8 degrees Celsius. This is also its melting point. This is the same as 234.3 Kelvin and -37.9 degrees Fahrenheit.

According to Jefferson Labs, mercury's melting and freezing point is -38.8 degrees Celsius; this is far lower than that of water. Its boiling point is 356.7 degrees Celsius, 629.9 Kelvin or 674.1 degrees Fahrenheit, far higher than water. At room temperature, mercury is a liquid. Mercury has an atomic number of 80 on the periodic table and has an atomic weight of 200.59. Mercury has seven different stable isotopes. The chemical symbol of mercury, Hg, comes from the Greek word "hydrargyrum," meaning "liquid silver."

Q&A Related to "What is the freezing point of mercury?"
The Freezing point of Mercury is in the following: Fahrenheit, Celsius and Kelvin. Fahrenheit = -37.89º. Celsius = -38.83º. Kelvin = 234.32.
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Mercury freezing point: -38.72 degrees C. Mercury boiling point: 357 degrees
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The freezing point of mercury is -38F If you are asking this for thermometer use, A mercury thermometer will probably lose accuracy somewhat above the freezing point, because as one
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200607...
1. Calculate the molar mass of the dissolved compound. Molar mass is calculated as the sum of mass of all atoms in the molecule. Atomic weights of corresponding elements are given
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