What Is the Freezing Point of Water?

Answer

The freezing point of water is 0 (zero) degrees Celsius. This when converted to Fahrenheit is +273. At this point water becomes solid and no longer flows.
4 Additional Answers
Ask.com Answer for: what is the freezing point of water
32 degrees Fahrenheit and 0 degrees celsius is the freezing point of water.
Under normal states, the freezing point of water is 0 ???øC. However, if salt is added to water, its freezing point becomes lower. The freezing point of water is the temperature at which water changes from liquid to solid.
Water will freeze at 32 degrees Fahrenheit, and water will boil at 212 degrees Fahrenheit. You can prevent your pipes from freezing in the winter by wrapping them or letting the water drip slightly.
Q&A Related to "What Is the Freezing Point of Water"
The freezing point of water is easy to remember because it is 0 degrees Celsius. For those using standard measurements that is 32 degrees Fahrenheit.
http://answers.ask.com/Science/Other/what_is_water...
1. Fill a container with as much water as you desire to lower the freezing point of. Check the temperature of the water. It is not necessary to have the water at a certain temperature
http://www.ehow.com/how_5934641_lower-freezing-poi...
0 °C or 32 °F or 273.15 K. Under standard conditions, pure water freezes at 0°Celsius, which is the same as 32 °Fahrenheit, which is 273.15 Kelvin. Note that the melting
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_freezing_poi...
1 MIX salt in water.
http://www.wikihow.com/Change-the-Freezing-Point-o...
Explore this Topic
The freezing point of water in Fahrenheit is 32 degrees Fahrenheit. This is the temperature at which the water changes from a liquid phase to a solid phase. At ...
The freezing point of water in Celsius is 0 degrees and in Fahrenheit it is 32 degrees. The lowest possible temperature is theoretically absolute zero and this ...
The freezing point of water is ordinarily 0 degrees Celsius or 32 degrees Fahrenheit. However, since it is possible for liquids to be supercooled this temperature ...
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