What Is the Function of a Capacitor?

Answer

A capacitor stores electric charge and is mainly used with resistors in timing circuits. It also acts as a filter by passing alternating current (AC), and blocking direct current (DC). The charge of a capacitor is measured in units called Farads.
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2 Additional Answers
The function of a capacitor is to store electric charge. Capacitor is used in electronics to block direct current and allow alternating current to pass for smoothing the output of power supplies.
The function of a capacitor is to store electric charge in a circuit. This phenomenon is used in a number of applications, including as a DC voltage block in AC circuits, an energy storage device to provide short bursts of power, and to correct for phase mismatch between current and voltage in AC circuits.
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An input capacitor has several functions in a circuit depending on how it has been used. Some of its uses include cutting ripple voltage, sound amplification, ...
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