What is inside a ping-pong ball?

Answer

Contrary to popular myth, table tennis or "ping-pong" balls are hollow and contain only regular air on the inside. However, when put to a lighter or flame, ping-pong balls ignite and burst into flame.

Standard ping-pong balls measure 40 millimeters in diameter and weigh 2.7 grams. Ping-pong balls have a matte finish and are made of celluloid plastic, which is flammable. This is the actual reason for the explosion. They are less dangerous to burn than older ping-pong balls, which consisted of acidified celluloid that became increasingly unstable over time; the slightest spark or heat from friction often ignited the balls.

Q&A Related to "What is inside a ping-pong ball?"
Nitrogen is in a ping pong ball. A surgeon once saved girl's life with ping
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-the-gas-ins...
Nothing is inside of a ping-pong ball but air, in simple, it is Hollow. Actually, there is a flamable chemical inside. Thats why its used to make smoke grenades. Look it up on youtube
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_are_inside_ping-pon...
Hmm yes. I'm not sure, although I'm guessing it's not just air because when you light a ping pong ball it goes nuts. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwAAZr0md…. That could either
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200803...
The first balls used to play ping pong were made out various materials, including the rounded tops of champagne corks and balls of string. After a trip to the United States in 1901,
http://www.ehow.com/facts_4923247_what-ping-pong-b...
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