What is the melting point of gold?

Answer

About reports the melting point of gold is 1,064.43 degrees Celsius. The melting point of a solid is the temperature at which it becomes a liquid. Gold's boiling point is 2,807 degrees Celsius.

The melting point of this element is an assigned value that is used for calibration in both the International Temperature Scale and the International Practical Temperature Scale. The International Temperature Scale is based on the Celsius scale. Its assigned values include the ice point, the steam point and the melting point of antimony, gold and silver along with the boiling points of oxygen and sulfur. The International Practical Temperature Scale, first established in 1968, has 16 assigned values for calibration purposes, including the melting point of gold.

Q&A Related to "What is the melting point of gold?"
Gold melts at 1064.18 °C (equal to 1947.52 °F )
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_melting_poin...
The melting point of brass, which is an alloy of the minerals copper and zinc, (Cu+Zn) is 850 degrees Celsius, which is 1562 degrees in Fahrenheit.
http://www.ask.com/web-answers/Science/Chemistry/w...
18K yellow gold has a melting point of 1675 degrees Fahrenheit & 14K yellow gold
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One key purpose of a melting point is to observe the characteristics of an unknown substance. This can help to give clues about the composition of the materials, or at minimum, provide
http://www.ehow.com/info_8744427_purpose-melting-p...
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Gold has a boiling point of 2,807 degrees Celsius and a melting point of 1,064.43 degrees Celsius. Gold is a chemical element with an atomic number of 79 and a ...
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