Melting Point of Silver?

Answer

The melting point of silver is 961.78 °C while its boiling point is 2162 °C. Silver is the best conductor of heat and electricity and thus it is used in the manufacture of electrical contacts and switch boards.
Q&A Related to "Melting Point of Silver?"
961.93 degrees Celsius.
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Zinc also burns inair with a bright bluish green flame giving off fumes of zinc oxide. Zinc reacts readily with aacids, alkalis and other non-metals.
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Silver (Ag) has a melting point of 1234.93 K (961.78 °C, 1763.2
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962 celcius
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3 Additional Answers
The melting point of pure silver is 961 degrees Celsius. It is a chemical element that has a high electrical and thermal conductivity. It is a precious metal that is mostly used to make jewellery, utensils and high value tableware.
The melting point of silver is 961.93 °C (1235.08 K, 1763.474 °F) and its uses include jewellery, photography and as an electrical conductor.
Silver is a chemical element with the atomic number 47 and its symbol is Ag. The melting point of silver is 961.78 Celsius or 1763.2 Fahrenheit or 1234.93 Kelvin. The density of silver at room temperature is 10.49 g.cm^-3 and its liquid density at melting point is 9.320 g.cm^-3. You can find more information here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver
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