New Jersey Plan?

Answer

The New Jersey plan was a proposal for the organization of the Government proposed by William Paterson at the Constitutional Convention on June 15, 1787. This plan was opposed by Edmund Randolph and James Madison and when the Connecticut Compromise was constructed New Jersey plan's legislative body was used as the model for the United States Senate.
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1. Use the State of New Jersey Travel & Tourism Web site to find and book accommodations throughout the state (see Resources below) 2. Book accommodations at the Minerals Hotel
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The New Jersey Plan was a proposal for the US Constitution. It was focused on insuring that small states got an equal share of representation in the government. In the final compromise
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The New Jersey plan was a plan providing for a single legislative house with equal
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State by proportion of either land size or population would
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Ask.com Answer for: what is the new jersey plan
New Jersey plan
NOUN [AMERICAN HISTORY]
1.
a plan, unsuccessfully proposed at the Constitutional Convention, providing for a single legislative house with equal representation for each state.
Source: Dictionary.com
The New Jersey Plan was the proposal written by William Paterson for the structure of the United States Government during the Philadelphia Convention on June 15 1787. The plan proposed that congress be unicameral and states be equally represented in congress. The plan gave large and small states equal power in congress.
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New Jersey plan was created in response to Virginia Plan. This was a proposal for the structure of US government presented by William Paterson at the constitution ...
The difference between the New Jersey Plan and the Virginia Plan is the former proposed equal state representation in Congress and the latter proposed state representation ...
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