What is the size of a tennis ball?

Answer

An official tennis ball is between 2.575 inches and 2.7 inches in diameter as defined by the International Tennis Federation. Tennis balls also must conform to other criteria if they are to be used in regulation play.

Tennis balls are covered in felt and have an internal pressure of 12 pounds per square inch. Tennis balls used in regulation play are optic yellow in color because the bright hue makes the balls highly visible both on the court and on television. The U.S. Open uses 70,000 tennis balls per year between practice and competitive game play. This equals 700 square yards of felt and more than 3,900 pounds of rubber.

Q&A Related to "What is the size of a tennis ball?"
A tennis ball must weigh more than 2 ounces but less than 2 1/16 ounces and its diameter must be between 2 1/2 and 2 5/8 inches.
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A tennis court that is regulation size is 78 feet long, divided equally into 39 foot halves. The tennis court is 27 feet across if you are playing with just two people, or 36 feet
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Early tennis balls were made from wool wrapped in sheep or goat stomachs and held together with rope. In the 1870s, lawn tennis balls were made from rubber manufactured by Charles
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The specifications for tennis balls are defined by the International Tennis Federation (ITF). This means the ball must be a certain size and weight and made with certain materials
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