What Is the Sliding Filament Theory?

Answer

The sliding filament theory is defined as the theory which describes the process used by muscles to contract. The theory explains that the thick and thin filaments within the sarcomere slide past one another, shortening the entire length of the sarcomere.
Q&A Related to "What Is the Sliding Filament Theory"
Before contraction: 1) no nerve impulse to myoneural junction. 2) Ca+ in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. 3) combining of actin and myosin is prevented by a tropomyosin-troponin complex
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The sliding filament theory is the explanation for how muscles produce force (or, usually,
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Actin myofilaments are gripped by myosin myofilament heads and pulled past the bodies of the myosin myofilaments producing the phenomenon known as the "Sliding Filament Theory&
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mechanism proposed for muscle contraction where myosin head groups of the thick filaments move along the interdigitated actin of the thin filaments, sliding past them and thereby
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/sl...
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