What Is the Solubility of Sugar in Water?

Answer

The solubility of sugar in water at 20 degrees Celsius is 204 grams in 100 cc. of water. At room temperatures, 2 grams of sugar are soluble in 1 cc. of water. The solubility of sugar varies depending on whether it is a monosaccharide, disaccharides or a polysaccharide.
Q&A Related to "What Is the Solubility of Sugar in Water"
Solubility of sugar in water depends upon the intensity of temperature. At 50 degree Celsius the solubility of sugar in water would be 2.59 g/ml.
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Sodium metal is very electropositive. It readily gives up its outermost electron to form the ion Na⁺. Sodium thus forms ionic, not covalent, bonds. Sodium carbonate in water
http://www.ehow.com/facts_5697695_solubility-sodiu...
Sugar dissolves in water because energy is given off when the slightly polar
http://www.chacha.com/question/why-is-sugar-solubl...
Solubility of benzoic acid in water is about 3 g per litre. Sugar (if you mean sucrose) has a solubility of about 2000 g per litre, so in relative terms sugar is about 650 times more
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1 Additional Answer
Solubility of solids increase with temperature for the same reason that solids tend to melt when heated. For instance, sugar is naturally soluble, but it is more soluble in hot water than cool water; this is because solubility constants, like other types of equilibrium constant, are functions of temperature.
Explore this Topic
Carbohydrates are soluble in water. All carbohydrates are considered sugars. Sugars are soluble in water due to the vast number of hydroxyl groups they contain.A ...
An example of solubility is the fact that sugar is very soluble in water. However, in another liquid, such as methyl alcohol, it is only somewhat soluble.Solubility ...
The definition of solubility is being able to dissolve. Solubility is being able to dissolve. For example, sugar has high solubility when combined with water. ...
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