What is zero gravity?

Answer

Zero gravity is a term often used to describe weightlessness, and it is often confused with microgravity. While escaping the gravitational pull of the Earth, sun and other celestial bodies can never be done completely, it is possible to create conditions of weightlessness that reduce the effects of localized gravity.

All objects with mass create gravitational fields, and a small amount of gravity can be found everywhere in space. By orbiting the Earth or entering a state of free-fall, it is possible to experience periods of microgravity where objects appear to become weightless. Even when in space, objects are still held in orbit due to the effects of gravity.

Q&A Related to "What is zero gravity?"
To understand how zero gravity works, you first have to understand Newton's third law of motion. Newton's third law tells us that if one object pushes or pulls on another object,
http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5004187_what-happens-...
well if you ask me well zero gravity is gravity its just some minerals taken out of gravity
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Zero Gravity is a sport bike manufacturer that has set the standard for windscreen
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Gravity if a force that is made from the rotation of the earth towards the most inner point. It is a force that always travels at a constant speed of -9.81 m/s squared.
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1 Additional Answer
Ask.com Answer for: what is zero gravity
zero gravity
NOUN [PHYSICS.]
1.
the condition in which the apparent effect of gravity is zero, as in the case of a body in free fall or in orbit.
Source: Dictionary.com
Explore this Topic
NASA does not have a zero gravity room since total lack of gravity is not possible. What NASA has is the Zero Gravity Research Facility where microgravity effects ...
Microgravity affects the human body as people become weightless. Astronauts and objects can typically float. Another name for microgravity is 'zero gravity'. ...
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