What part of the brain controls sight?

Answer

Located at the back of the brain, the occipital lobes are the part of it responsible for sight. They are part of the cerebral cortex. The temporal lobes and the parietal lobe also play a role in visual perception.

The occipital lobe's effect on vision is evidenced in the event of brain damage, such as a stroke. If the occipital lobes are involved in the stroke, the victim experiences vision damage. Such a stroke may cause the victim to experience difficulty in recognizing people or objects, partial blindness, color blindness or difficulty in interpreting the happenings in the world around him.

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