What does a zero-tolerance law mean?

Answer

The zero tolerance law is used to describe a set of rules that allow for absolutely no exceptions. If a law is broken, zero tolerance extends full punishment and makes no reviews or modifications according to severity of the act. Zero tolerance policies are studied in criminology, common in formal and informal policing systems around the world.
Q&A Related to "What does a zero-tolerance law mean?"
The Zero Tolerance law is a law to prevent minors from drinking and driving. The laws different slightly in each state. It states that anyone under 21 caught driving with a certain
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"Zero tolerance" means that a described behavior or action will result in immediate described consequences. Schools have written zero tolerance policies about weapons, drugs
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Zero-tolerance laws are part of an overall movement to reduce fatalities among young drivers. The first steps taken were to raise the minimum drinking age from 18 to 21, which took
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The law means that it is illegal for a minor to drive while having ANY detectable
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1 Additional Answer
The zero tolerance law applies to a person under age 21 who operates a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.02% or more but not more than 0.07%. If you are stopped by a police officer for having consumed alcohol, you will be temporarily detained for the purpose of taking a breathalyzer test to determine your blood alcohol level.
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